Lifestyle interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in clinical populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of different strategies and effects on cardiometabolic health

No changes in adolescent’s sedentary behaviour across Europe between 2002 and 2017
April 28, 2021
Sedentary Behavior During COVID-19: Implications for Health and a Framework for Behavior Change 
May 12, 2021
Show all

Photo by Cedric Fauntleroy from Pexels

A new study titled “Lifestyle interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in clinical populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of different strategies and effects on cardiometabolic health” has recently been published in Preventive Medicine (available online here, the journal issue is currently in progress). Citation details, highlights and a summary of the study are re-posted below. 

Nieste, I., Franssen, W. M. A., Spaas, J., Bruckers, L., Savelberg, H. H. C. M., & Eijnde, B. O. (2021). Lifestyle interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in clinical populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of different strategies and effects on cardiometabolic health. Preventive Medicine, 148, 106593. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106593

Highlights

  • Lifestyle interventions reduce objective sedentary behaviour in clinical populations.
  • Sedentary behaviour reductions are larger following multicomponent interventions.
  • Reducing sedentary time by 1 h/day improves cardiometabolic health risk markers.
  • Future studies are warranted to align exercise and sedentary time recommendations.

Abstract

Cardiometabolic comorbidities are highly prevalent in clinical populations, and have been associated (partly) with their sedentary lifestyle. Although lifestyle interventions targeting sedentary behaviour (SB) have been studied extensively in the general population, the effect of such strategies in clinical populations is not yet clear. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effect of different lifestyle interventions on SB and cardiometabolic health in clinical populations.

Randomised controlled trials were collected from five bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus). Studies were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated a lifestyle intervention to reduce objectively measured SB, in comparison with a control intervention among persons with a clinical condition. Data were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis.

In total, 7094 studies were identified. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were categorised in five population groups: overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, neurological/cognitive and musculoskeletal diseases. Participants reduced their SB by 64 min/day (95%CI: [−91, −38] min/day; p < 0.001), with larger within-group differences of multicomponent behavioural interventions including motivational counselling, self-monitoring, social facilitation and technologies (−89 min/day; 95%CI: [−132, −46] min/day; p < 0.001). Blood glycated haemoglobin concentration (−0.17%; 95% CI: [−0.30, −0.04]%; p = 0.01), fat percentage (−0.66%; 95% CI: [−1.26, −0.06]%, p = 0.03) and waist circumference (−1.52 cm; 95%CI: [−2.84, −0.21] cm; p = 0.02) were significantly reduced in the intervention groups compared to control groups.

Behavioural lifestyle interventions reduce SB among clinical populations and improve cardiometabolic risk markers such as waist circumference, fat percentage, and glycaemic control.

To access the full article, please visit this link.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *