A Combined Health Action Process Approach and mHealth Intervention to Increase Non‐Sedentary Behaviours in Office‐Working Adults—A Randomised Controlled Trial

Is adherence to 24-hour movement guidelines for children and youth associated with academic performance?
May 13, 2020
Impact of sedentarism due to the COVID-19 home confinement on neuromuscular, cardiovascular and metabolic health
May 28, 2020
Show all

A paper titled “A Combined Health Action Process Approach and mHealth Intervention to Increase Non‐Sedentary Behaviours in Office‐Working Adults—A Randomised Controlled Trial” was published in the Applied Psychology: Health Well‐Being on April 28, 2020. The full-text article can be accessed here.

Study summary

Background

Office‐working adults represent an at‐risk population for high levels of sedentary behaviour (SB), which has been associated with an increased risk for numerous chronic diseases. This study examined the effectiveness of a Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) based planning intervention augmented with tailored text messages to reduce workplace sitting time (primary outcome) and increase specific non‐SBs (i.e. standing time, walking time, stretching time, break frequency, break duration). A secondary purpose was to examine relationships among HAPA volitional constructs and sedentary and non‐SBs.

Methods

Full‐time office workers (Mage = 45.18 ± 11.33 years) from Canada were randomised into either a HAPA intervention (n = 29) or control (n = 31) condition. Workplace sitting time, time spent in specific non‐SBs, and HAPA volitional constructs were assessed at baseline, weeks 2, 4, 6 (post‐intervention), and 8 (follow‐up).

Results

Significant group by time interaction effects, that favoured the intervention group, were found for sitting time (p = .003, ɳp2 = .07), standing time (p = .019, ɳp2 = .05), and stretching time (p = .001, ɳp2 = .08) as well as for action planning (p < .001, ɳp2 = .20), coping planning (p < .001, ɳp2 = .18), and action control (p < .001, ɳp2 = .15). Significant correlations (p < .05) were also found between the HAPA constructs and time spent sitting, standing, walking, as well as break frequency.

Conclusions

Augmenting a HAPA‐based planning intervention with text messages can reduce workplace sitting time in office workers.

Authors and affiliation

Scott Rollo & Harry Prapavessis,
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Citation

Rollo, S. and Prapavessis, H. (2020), A Combined Health Action Process Approach and mHealth Intervention to Increase Non‐Sedentary Behaviours in Office‐Working Adults—A Randomised Controlled Trial. Appl Psychol Health Well‐Being. doi:10.1111/aphw.12201

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *