Is there a bidirectional association between sedentary behaviour and cognitive decline in older adults? Findings from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

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A study titled “­­­Is there a bidirectional association between sedentary behaviour and cognitive decline in older adults? Findings from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing” has recently been published in Preventive Medicine Reports (available here). The summary of the paper and citation details are re-posted below.

ABSTRACT

Research on whether sedentary behaviour (SB) is related to cognitive decline in older individuals is conflicting, potentially caused by methodological differences in previous studies. To inform public health policies, we analysed both the forward and reverse association across four-years between subjective TV time and objectively-measured SB and four cognitive outcome measures in older adults. The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) quantified time spent watching TV using a questionnaire and objective physical activity patterns with a GENEActiv accelerometer. Mixed model analysis examined whether these two measures of SB related to changes in cognitive function (immediate and delayed recall, MMSE, and animal naming task) during a four-year follow-up period. Furthermore, the reverse association between changes in cognition over the preceding four years and SB was investigated. We included 1,276 participants (67 ± 9 years). Longitudinally, every hour of objective SB per day was associated with a −0.01 (95%CI = −0.03;−0.00) lower MMSE score per year. Reversely, a worse decline in immediate and delayed recall over the preceding waves was related to slightly more objective SB (B = −0.24 (95%CI = −0.41;−0.07)) and TV time (B = −0.25 (95%CI = −0.48;−0.03)) at the end of those four years. To conclude, in healthy older individuals, higher levels of objective SB are related to cognitive decline across a four-year follow-up, although the magnitude and clinical relevance are questionable. As preceding cognitive decline is associated with more SB across follow-up, this suggests that a bidirectional association is plausible.

CITATION

Maasakkers, C. M., Claassen, J. A., Scarlett, S., Thijssen, D. H., Kenny, R. A., Feeney, J., & Melis, R. J. (2021). Is there a bidirectional association between sedentary behaviour and cognitive decline in older adults? Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. Preventive Medicine Reports, 101423. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101423

 

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