Sedentary behaviour and related factors in people with multiple sclerosis

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Subtypes of major depressive disorders and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors in the community
December 8, 2023

A paper titled “Sedentary behaviour and related factors in people with multiple sclerosis” was recently published in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. A summary of the article and citation details are re-posted below. The full article can be found here. 

ABSTRACT

Background
Sedentary behaviour is a major problem in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). However, little is known about the related factors of sedentary behaviour in MS. Our study aimed to examine the association between sedentary behaviour and physical activity level, fear of falling, and fatigue.

Method
Demographic and clinical data have been recorded. Sedentary behaviour was assessed with the Marshall Sitting Questionnaire, physical activity level was evaluated with the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, fear of falling was evaluated with the Fall Efficacy Scale International, and fatigue was evaluated with the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS). The Timed 25-Foot Walk, 6-Minute Walk Test, Timed Up and Go Test, and 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale were also used to assess walking and perceived walking disability.

Results
We recruited 71 pwMS [49 were female (69%), mean age:38.08 years, median EDSS:1.5]. The mean daily sitting time was 593.54 minutes (∼10 hours). No significant correlation was found between sitting times and demographics, leisure time physical activity, fear of falling, walking, perceived walking disability, and neurological disability level (p>0.05). Logistic regression analysis indicated that being male increased the risk of sedentary behaviour by 3.08 times, being employed increased the risk of sitting by 4.65 times, and each point increase in MFIS scores resulted in a 1.03-fold elevation in the odds of prolonged sitting.

Conclusion
The fact that pwMS, even with a mild disability spend almost 10 hours sitting highlights the significance of sedentary behaviour in this population. Developing strategies to address modifiable factors, such as fatigue, may be effective in reducing sedentary behaviour.

CITATION

Ertekin, Ö., Kara, T., Abasıyanık, Z., Kahraman, T., & Özakbaş, S. Sedentary behaviour and related factors in people with multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 105152. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2023.105152 

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